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Today (13:24)  Delhi Metro ride to get costlier again, fare hike likely from October 10 | delhi news | Hindustan Times (www.hindustantimes.com)
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Other NewsDMRC/Delhi Metro  -  

News Entry# 318255     
   Past Edits
This is a new feature showing past edits to this News Post.
 
 
Delhi Metro rides will get more expensive from October, as the fares are set to increase for a second time this year starting October. However, the hike won’t be too steep this time, going to a maximum of Rs 10.
When the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) had announced fare hikes in May earlier this year, as per the recommendations of the fourth Fare Fixation Committee, they had proposed a phased increase. Phase one of the hike has been effective since May 2017, and the second phase will be effective from October.
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2, initially supposed to be implemented from October 1, will most likely be implemented from October 10, according to DMRC sources.
According to DMRC, the fare will increase by up to Rs 10. After the hike, it will cost commuters between Rs 10 and Rs 60 to ride the metro. Passengers travelling less than 2 kilometres will see no difference in fares, as the minimum fare will continue to be Rs 10. For distances between two and five kilometres, the fare will be hiked by Rs 5 from Rs 15 to Rs 20.
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For all other distance zones, fares will increase by Rs 10, with the maximum fare for journeys longer than 32 kms increasing from Rs 50 to Rs 60.
The DMRC had recorded a fall in ridership when they had first hiked the rates in May 2017. The maximum fare then was hiked from Rs 30 to Rs 50. Ridership for the month of June dropped by over 44.8 lakh across the six lines from 2016 to 2017, with the highest drop recorded for line 2. Line 2 had a ridership of 2.92 crores in June 2016, which declined by over 21 lakhs to 2.7 crores in June 2017.
However, a DMRC spokesperson said that the ridership had since picked up, and the hike was necessary to meet their input costs.
“Electricity tariffs have increased by almost 100 per cent, and the DMRC pays industrial tariffs. We need to meet our input costs. Nobody otherwise would like to hike fares,” they said.
The DMRC had been dealing with depleting savings, a Rs 45,000 crore debt and increasing operating ratio, which left little for maintenance, before it revised its fares in May.
“The necessity of revision in fares was on account of increase in the cost of inputs - the staff costs, the cost of energy and the cost of repair and maintenance,” a DMRC spokesperson had said then. “Since constitution of the third fare fixation committee, there has been increase in the rate of industrial dearness allowance (DA) by 95.5 per cent (from 16.90 per cent to 112.40 per cent), rate of Central DA by 103 per cent (from 22 per cent to 125 per cent) and average increase in the rate of minimum wages by 156.2 per cent. The last fare revision took place in 2009 and the 4th committee was set up after almost seven years.”
For all other distance zones, fares will increase by Rs 10, with the maximum fare for journeys longer than 32 kms increasing from Rs 50 to Rs 60.
The DMRC had recorded a fall in ridership when they had first hiked the rates in May 2017. The maximum fare then was hiked from Rs 30 to Rs 50. Ridership for the month of June dropped by over 44.8 lakh across the six lines from 2016 to 2017, with the highest drop recorded for line 2. Line 2 had a ridership of 2.92 crores in June 2016, which declined by over 21 lakhs to 2.7 crores in June 2017.
However, a DMRC spokesperson said that the ridership had since picked up, and the hike was necessary to meet their input costs.
“Electricity tariffs have increased by almost 100 per cent, and the DMRC pays industrial tariffs. We need to meet our input costs. Nobody otherwise would like to hike fares,” they said.
The DMRC had been dealing with depleting savings, a Rs 45,000 crore debt and increasing operating ratio, which left little for maintenance, before it revised its fares in May.
“The necessity of revision in fares was on account of increase in the cost of inputs - the staff costs, the cost of energy and the cost of repair and maintenance,” a DMRC spokesperson had said then. “Since constitution of the third fare fixation committee, there has been increase in the rate of industrial dearness allowance (DA) by 95.5 per cent (from 16.90 per cent to 112.40 per cent), rate of Central DA by 103 per cent (from 22 per cent to 125 per cent) and average increase in the rate of minimum wages by 156.2 per cent. The last fare revision took place in 2009 and the 4th committee was set up after almost seven years.”
  
Today (13:00)  Whose JAM is it anyway? (allaboutbelgaum.com)
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Commentary/Human InterestSWR/South Western  -  

News Entry# 318254     
   Past Edits
Sep 26 2017 (13:00)
Station Tag: Belagavi (Belgaum)/BGM added by Soon a SF on Gadag Hotgi Section~/48335

Sep 26 2017 (13:00)
Train Tag: Belagavi - Hubballi Fast Passenger/56922 added by Soon a SF on Gadag Hotgi Section~/48335
 
 
Monday morning blues have been extended to the afternoon and evening as well. The city slept as it did for so many years but got up with a shock that the British built Railway over bridge which starts at the Gogte circle and ends near Maratha Mandir has been closed for traffic.
The early morning goers did not face much issue as with less traffic they maneuvered around but just spent more time travelling. But as soon the sun started to rise, Traffic jams also grew and to cover a distance of 150 mtrs it took 20 mins at second gate with an ambulance for company.
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could not turn from first gate, so a JCB came in around 9 and broke the divider at first gate. The second gate was a Mess with two way traffic and total chaos and almost 5 schools in the vicinity upto 1030 this was worse, later the jams began as each one had urgency to reach early.
DCP Crime Amarnath Reddy had to stop vehicles at 2nd gate and get some discipline in force. One can only take a Left from Second gate as well on Congress road same as First gate so again issues with people.
The Kapileshwar RoB must have taken the highest pressure today, with long lines on each side where line even touched the Shivaji Garden on SPM road. Shani Temple side no one knows where he or she will land on the left or right, it was so chaotic. We had done a walk through on bike when the RoB was made in less than 120 seconds and now one needs more than 20 mins to cross the RoB.
At this moment we also need to think on the emergency services like Fire brigade, who have their station on Khanapur road and with closure of the road how will they service an emergency in time on the northern side is a great issue. The administration must make space for a temporary fire station somewhere in north of the city or this could be disastrous.
Was this closure only a trial or will it be completely shut for next 18 months, that’s the time needed for the new RoB to be complete?
We did see the police but with very little staff with them how they will manage this is a great concern. Second gate has so many schools and with a large populace staying on the other side of Congress road, they will have to walk through or park their vehicles elsewhere or take a long turn.
May what it be but as citizens we must follow the traffic rules, be to your left and try and not overtake haphazardly.
Untill this JAM is cleared, and we come to whose Jam is it, Lets Pray and get ourselves some good civic sense.
  
Today (12:56)  Oh! God. Help us cross this bridge! (allaboutbelgaum.com)
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Commentary/Human InterestSWR/South Western  -  

News Entry# 318253     
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This is a new feature showing past edits to this News Post.
 
 
Cities are known to collectively respond to landmarks, something that bears testimony to the fact that inanimate things also trigger emotions when they are an intrinsic part of one’s life. The railway over-bridge is closed from today and the city has just gasped together in disbelief. Not until very long ago, the term bridge meant only this one, although Gandhinagar also had one. Now that there is another, we’re still confused what to call which. There is utter chaos in the city right now and people from the Southern parts panicked to reach out to the business part of the North. The alternatives, viz. the new Kapileshwar bridge, the Fulbag galli railway gate, first and second railway gate are all jammed. I could personally see auto drivers and motorists getting into fisticuffs. Since there is already minimal civic sense, matter have turned worse, especially on the first day.
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then seeing the barricades at Basveshwar Circle, prohibiting vehicles from embarking on the old bridge brought gushes of old memories.
We, the people of Shahapur, always referred to the Business part of the city as Belagavi ( for we were in Shahapur). Any mention of you visiting the other end would invariably be combined with ‘are going from inside or outside’ which meant from the Kapileshwar gate or the bridge. The former was a longer commute but took less effort while the latter meant getting stuck when a train arrived. The bridge was a metaphor for connecting the home and work, which also included schools. At a time when Mangal Metal works was being built and soon after that, when there was no cross road drains built to drain out the storm waters, the monsoons brought heavy torrents of water from one side to the other. We would gauge the intensity of the rains with that.
The only major landmark was the Maruti temple, later joined by the Raghavendra Swami matha, which would also submerge right until a few steps leading to the Vrindavan. The small puddle besides the tracks would swell and look like a lake, replete with waves. As with most British era bridges, this one is also crooked. The elevation from the suburbs towards the city is longer while it is steeper coming from the city towards Goaves. This meant we would huff and puff both ways, pedaling to our schools and back on cycles. But the journey back home meant we could just slide without any effort on the decline. The walls at the middle would see election symbols while the railings have never quite changed in height for years.
The bridge looked different from below, seen only while travelling in trains. It looked another way from the Congress road, lights of vehicles glimmering at night. Inspite of its traffic, this bridge always comes across as melancholy, sporting a forlorn look, quite snobbish (could be a British trait ! ) and generally disconnected while just being there.
It has been many years since the experts have been worrying about its strength. However, one can hardly understand why the hurry to reconstruct when alternatives are not in shape. With the PB Road bridge still not complete and mostly to take a few more months, the three railway gates always crammed to capacity with dozens of trains plying, the Kapileshwar bridge too feeble to handle this mad rush, how will the citizens stay sane? Some things that come to mind after witnessing the pandemonium today, twice- Deputing traffic cops to first ensure no lane crossing. That bad habit is the root cause of all traffic jams and Belagavi people are notorious to encroach on the other side all the time.
If this is a test, to stop it till the P.B. Road bridge is ready. Clear the roads of all encroachments, haphazardly parked vehicles blocking small streets, limiting entry of trucks during busy hours and encouraging people to use vehicles only when necessary could be some minor measures. Can’t imagine what will ensue in the festival season.
The city has grown too big and people are too busy to suffer this for too long.
  
Today (12:21)  Railway Board Makes It Mandatory For Kiosks To Display Books On Indian Values And Morals (www.huffingtonpost.in)
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IR Affairs

News Entry# 318252   Blog Entry# 2443895     
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A vendor works at a stall at a railway platform in Mumbai May 1, 2008.
In a commercial circular dated September 5, the Railway Board instructed all general managers to ensure that such books are found in railway stalls under the new Multi Purpose Stall (MPS) Policy.
"Zonal railways shall ensure that all MPS must display and sell books pertaining to Indian tradition, culture, values, morals and history," the circular, a copy of which is with PTI, stated. All miscellaneous, curio stalls, bookstalls, chemist stalls will now come under the multi-purpose stalls, it
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The policy supersedes the Bookstall Policy of 2004 which mandated that stalls will keep books on varied subjects like literature, history, children's literature, fiction, travel, light reading, art, culture, current affairs, professional interests, national integration, etc. in English, Hindi and regional languages.
The MPS Policy was drafted after it was felt that there was a need to have a single outlet at platforms from where passengers can purchase non-catering items required during travel.
The stalls will also sell artefacts and items of local and regional importance, proprietary article depot items, drinking water, over-the-counter medicines and non-pharmacy items like dry milk powder, the circular said.
The policy also states that it will be mandatory for all such stalls to display and sell prominently the zonal railway timetable as well as the 'Trains at a Glance' publication and any other official publications of the railways.
Retailers, individuals, self-help groups can apply for a licence to run these stalls. The allotment will be done after a tendering process, the policy states.
The new policy has also made it mandatory for such stalls to have a point of sale or swipe machine for acceptance of credit and debit cards from all customers without charging any additional transaction charge for any sale above Rs 100. For amounts below Rs 100, payments through e-wallet would be acceptable, the policy said.
Also on HuffPost India:

  
206 views
Today (13:00)
srinivasvasanthi~   4050 blog posts   15 correct pred (54% accurate)
Re# 2443895-1            Tags   Past Edits
Requested our IR to sell their Trains at Glance, 4 Regional Zonal Railway time table at Rs 30 per copy.More ad more advertisements have to be included so as to reduce price.
Example ..The Hindu daily with 30 pages production cost around Rs 16.But they sold at Chennai Metro at Rs 4 only.They derived more and more commercial advertisements and reduced the price for the public benefits and vide circulation.

  
148 views
Today (13:12)
WDP4   585 blog posts
Re# 2443895-2            Tags   Past Edits
No need of Trains at Glance anymore. What new change will come? Most trains speeded up by 1 or 2 mins. So better start buying "MORAL" and "INDIAN VALUES" books and become a model citizen of the country.
  
Today (12:20)  Big setback for Delhi Metro passengers; this is the big punishing step DMRC is set to take from October 3 - The Financial Express (www.financialexpress.com)
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Commentary/Human InterestDMRC/Delhi Metro  -  

News Entry# 318251     
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This is a new feature showing past edits to this News Post.
 
 
It is nothing but a big setback for Delhi Metro passengers. Travelling in Delhi Metro is likely to get a more expensive for commuters as the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) is all set to kick in the second phase of its fare hike from October 1. While the first phase of the hike took place in the month of May earlier this year when DMRC had revised its fares with effect from May 10. The second phase will kick in from October 1, but the hike will be implemented from October 3 as October 1 is Sunday and October 2 is Gandhi Jayanti that is a national holiday. According to Times of India, the discounted metro fare that will be provided under the latest hike that will remain Rs 10 for the first 5 km, but will be increased by Rs 10 subsequently in each slab, going up to a...
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maximum of Rs 50.
The customers are currently paying Rs 10 for 0-2 kms, Rs 15 for 2-5 kms, Rs 20 for 5-12 kms, Rs 30 for 12-21 kms, Rs 40 for 21-32 kms and Rs 50 for more than 32 kms. Once the revised rates kick in, commuters will have to pay Rs 10 for 0-2 kms, Rs 20 for 2-5 kms, Rs 30 for 5-12 kms, Rs 40 for 12-21 kms, Rs 50 for 21-32 kms and Rs 60 for more than 32 kms.
The report further states that DMRC since its last fare revision in May has seen a dip in the number of commuters that used its service. A fall of almost 1.5 lakh passengers per day has been reported as compared to the numbers of June 2016. While talking about the dip in footfall, Managing Director of DMRC, Mangu Singh said that the corporation is not worried that the second phase of fare revision might lead a further dip in footfall, in an interview to TOI. He further added that the fares of Delhi Metro were last revised in 2009 and DMRC had been demanding a hike for a long time, citing the increase in operation costs, including the cost of electricity and the rising wage bill. A DMRC spokesperson was quoted saying, “The necessity of revision in fares was on account of increase in the cost of inputs, viz. the staff costs, the cost of energy and the cost of repair and maintenance.”
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